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Q.

Does catching a cold have anything to do with exposure to cold weather?

Related Topics: Cold, Exposure, Coldness
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

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A.

Though the common cold usually occurs in the fall and winter months, the cold weather itself does not cause the common cold. Rather, it is thought that during cold-weather months people spend more time indoors in close proximity to each other, thus facilitating the spread of the virus. For this same reason, children in day care and school are particularly prone to acquiring the common cold.

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Common Cold

Answers from Contributors (1)

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A.
The fact is cold weather itself does not cause the common cold. The prevalance of common cold increases during cold weather as people spend more time indoors in packed room with other family members, facilitating the spread of the virus. The low humidity during winter climate can also be considered as contributing factor to increase the spread of common cold.


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