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Q.

What is the treatment for bruising?

Related Topics: Bruise
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

5,093 Answers
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A.

There are a couple of things that you can do to prevent or minimize bruising after an injury. First, try a cold compress. Put ice in a plastic bag, wrap the bag in a towel (applying the ice directly to the skin can cause frostbite), and place it on the injured area. Commercial ice packs are also available, but a bag of frozen peas makes an excellent substitute. It molds to the shape of the injured area and can then be re-frozen and used again (but don't eat them!).

The cold reduces the blood flow to the area and therefore limits bleeding into the skin and reduces the size of the bruise. The cold also decreases the inflammation in the area of the injury and limits swelling in this way as well. If possible, elevate the area above the level of the heart. The lower an extremity is below the heart, the more blood will flow to the area and increase the bleeding and swelling.

Avoid taking medications that can contribute to bruising. If you have any questions about whether or not your medication can contribute to bruising, ask your health-care practitioner or pharmacist. Do not stop any prescription medications without first contacting your health-care practitioner.

Finally, pressure applied to the area (by hand, not with tourniquets) can reduce bleeding.

People who take medicines that reduce clotting ("blood thinners") or have clotting abnormalities should seek the advice of a physician or other health-care provider immediately, as should the elderly or those who have experienced significantly severe trauma.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Bumps and Bruises