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Q.

Besides angina, what are other causes of chest pain?

Related Topics: Angina, Chest, Pain
 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

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A.

In caring for patients with chest pain, the doctor distinguishes whether the pain is related to a lack of oxygen to the heart muscle (as in angina or heart attack), or is due to another process. Many conditions are considered that can cause similar chest pain. Examples include:

  • Pleuritis (pleurisy): Inflammation of the lining of the lungs (pleuritis) causes sharp chest pain, which is aggravated by deep breathing and coughing. Patients often notice shortness of breath, in part due to their shallow breathing to minimize chest pain. Viral infections are the most common causes of pleurisy. 
  • Pericarditis: Pericarditis is inflammation of the lining around the heart. Symptoms of pericarditis are similar to that of pleuritis.
  • Pneumonia: Pneumonia (bacterial infection of the lung) causes fever and chest pain. Chest pain in bacterial pneumonia is due to an irritation or infection of the lining of the lung.
  • Pulmonary embolism: Pulmonary embolism refers to blood clots traveling from the veins of the pelvis or the lower extremities to the lung. Pulmonary embolism can cause death of lung tissue (pulmonary infarction). Some common causes of blood clots in these veins is deep vein thrombosis.
  • Pneumothorax: Small sacs in the lung tissue (alveoli) can spontaneously burst, causing pneumothorax. Symptoms of pneumothorax include sudden, severe, sharp chest pain and shortness of breath. One common cause of pneumothorax is severe emphysema.
  • Mitral valve prolapse:Mitral valve prolapse is a common heart valve abnormality, affecting 5% to 10% of the population. Chest pain with MVP is usually sharp but not severe. Unlike angina, chest pain with MVP rarely occurs during or after exercise, and usually will not respond to nitroglycerin.
  • Aortic dissection: The aorta is the major vessel delivering blood from the left ventricle to the rest of the body. Aortic dissection (tearing of the aorta wall) is a life-threatening emergency. Aortic dissection causes severe, unrelenting chest and back pain. 
  • Costochondritis, rib fractures, muscle strain or spasm: Pain originating from the chest wall is usually sharp and constant. It is usually worsened by movement, coughing, deep breathing, and direct pressure on the area. Muscle spasm and strain can result from vigorous, unusual twisting and bending. The joints between the ribs and cartilage next to the breastbone can become inflamed, a condition called costochondritis. Fractured ribs resulting from trauma or cancer involvement can cause significant chest pain.
  • Nerve compression: Compression of the nerve roots by bone spurs as they exit the spinal cord can cause pain. Nerve compression can also cause weakness and numbness in the upper arm and chest.
  • Shingles (herpes zoster infection of the nerves): Shingles is nerve irritation from the infection, which can cause chest pain days before any typical rash appears.
  • Esophageal spasm and reflux: The esophagus is the long muscular tube connecting the mouth to the stomach. Reflux, or regurgitation of stomach contents and acid into the esophagus, can cause heartburn and chest pain. Spasm of the muscle of the esophagus can also cause chest pain. 
  • Gallbladder attack (gallstones): Gallstones can block the gallbladder or bile ducts and cause severe pain of the upper abdomen, back, and chest.
  • Anxiety and panic attacks: Anxiety, depression, and panic attacks are frequently associated with chest pain lasting from minutes to days. The pain can be sharp or dull. It is usually accompanied by shortness of breath, or the inability to take a deep breath. Since there is no test for panic attacks, patients with chest pain usually undergo tests to exclude coronary artery disease and other causes of chest pain.

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Archived: March 20, 2014

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Read the Original Article: Angina

Answers from Contributors (3)

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A.
Wow nobody mentioned Hemothorax 


which is when generally the space around your long or lung's fills with blood causing one or both lung's to collapse, In my case i had a single left hemothorax So they sedated and paralyzed me (very risky due to my MMD) made a 1 inch incision on my left side spread my ribs a little and inserted a tube to start removing the blood,while at the same time i was intubated and on a ventilator, so as they removed blood they could reinflate my lung and happily it worked and i survived the Paralytic medication although i did have a malignant hyperthermic reaction they expected it and where ready for it.

Peace

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besides angina  i also have shortness of breath and become light headness, feel like i'm going to throw up, numdness in my left leg. tried all the time.blurred vision also.

The opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.down arrowThe opinions expressed here are solely those of the User.
User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice. Please see the
bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

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