My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Ask Your Question

WebMD Answers

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support.

Posted: | Report This Report Question |
Q.

What are the possible side effects of Avelox?

 

Answers From Experts & Organizations (1)

3,244 Answers
22,229 Helpful Votes
77 Followers
A.

Avelox can cause side effects that may be serious or even cause death.

Serious side effects of Avelox include:

  • Central Nervous System effects
    Seizures have been reported in people who take fluoroquinolone antibiotics including Avelox. Tell your health care provider if you have a history of seizures. Ask your health care provider whether taking Avelox will change your risk of having a seizure. Central Nervous System (CNS) side effects may happen as soon as after taking the first dose of Avelox. Talk to your health care provider right away if you have any of these side effects, or other changes in mood or behavior:
    • Feeling dizzy.
    • Seizures.
    • Hear voices, see things, or sense things that are not there (hallucinations).
    • Feel restless.
    • Tremors.
    • Feel anxious or nervous.
    • Confusion.
    • Depression.
    • Trouble sleeping.
    • Feel more suspicious (paranoia).
    • Suicidal thoughts or acts.
    • Nightmares.
  • Serious allergic reactions
    Allergic reactions can happen in people taking fluoroquinolones, including Avelox, even after only one dose. Stop taking Avelox and get emergency medical help right away if you get any of the following symptoms of a severe allergic reaction:
    • Hives.
    • Trouble breathing or swallowing.
    • Swelling of the lips, tongue, face.
    • Throat tightness, hoarseness.
    • Rapid heartbeat.
    • Faint.
    • Yellowing of the skin or eyes. Stop taking Avelox and tell your health care provider right away if you get yellowing of your skin or white part of your eyes, or if you have dark urine. These can be signs of a serious reaction to Avelox (a liver problem).
  • Skin rash
    Skin rash may happen in people taking Avelox even after only one dose. Stop taking Avelox at the first sign of a skin rash and call your health care provider. Skin rash may be a sign of a more serious reaction to Avelox.
  • Serious heart rhythm changes (QT prolongation and torsade de pointes) Tell your health care provider right away if you have a change in your heart beat (a fast or irregular heartbeat), or if you faint. Avelox may cause a rare heart problem known as prolongation of the QT interval. This condition can cause an abnormal heartbeat and can be very dangerous. The chances of this event are higher in people:
    • Who are elderly.
    • With a family history of prolonged QT interval.
    • With low blood potassium (hypokalemia).
    • Who take certain medicines to control heart rhythm (antiarrhythmics).
  • Intestine infection (Pseudomembranous colitis) Pseudomembranous colitis can happen with most antibiotics, including Avelox. Call your health care provider right away if you get watery diarrhea, diarrhea that does not go away, or bloody stools. You may have stomach cramps and a fever. Pseudomembranous colitis can happen 2 or more months after you have finished your antibiotic.
  • Changes in sensation and possible nerve damage (Peripheral Neuropathy) Damage to the nerves in arms, hands, legs, or feet can happen in people taking fluoroquinolones, including Avelox. Talk with your health care provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms of peripheral neuropathy in your arms, hands, legs, or feet:
    • Pain.
    • Burning.
    • Tingling.
    • Numbness.
    • Weakness.

Avelox may need to be stopped to prevent permanent nerve damage.

  • Sensitivity to sunlight (photosensitivity)

The most common side effects of Avelox include nausea and diarrhea. These are not all the possible side effects of Avelox. Tell your health care provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

This answer should not be considered medical advice...down arrowThis answer should not be considered medical advice and should not take the place of a doctor’s visit. Please see the bottom of the page for more information or visit our Terms and Conditions.up arrow

Posted:
| Report This Report Answer

Was this helpful?

YesNo

Thanks for your feedback.

27 of 28 found this helpful
Read the Original Article: Avelox